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Writings on music, art, technology and life.

VideoŽurnal W48

Midst a lot of very urgent work, what does the serial procrastinator do? Creates something that is not THAT urgent to do. A videožurnal (video journal) episode, and posts it to his Patreon page!

 

I’ve read Amanda Palmer’s book The Art of Asking. You know she’s the most successful music artist on Patreon? Her book is a lot about her life, where’s she’s coming from and it becomes pretty clear how she ended up where she did. I have notes & quotes from reading it. And it is quite inspirational and up-to-date with exactly what’s happening now – you know: twitter, crowdfunding, kickstarter, patreon, relationship-based “economy/marketing” aka your fans are your friends etc. In this context I will reflect on this year by the end of the month too.

The end of november didn’t bring another music video/release, although I was planning it. I had a concept, I had a loose synopsis for the video, I had ideas for remixes/edits, but didn’t have anough time or stamina to push it through in time. I’m learning to accept the tempo I’m working in. And I’m happy for any cheers on this path, honestly!

Along with the plan of finding a way to conitiuously offer an insight to my studio & work, here comes another timelapse video-journal, backed-up with an older track from an album released in 2004 (Z. Spavatsky: d0).

Please enjoy. It’s a december gift to you, my friends.

 

žurnaldela W41Y2016

Last week or two were pretty intense work-wise. But most of things went through pretty smoothly, so I’m quite happy about it. A sense of achievement is somewhere around here…, present. And that’s good. Despite the cold.

For a while now I’ve been trying different things to find a way to update my patrons on the inner workings of what I create. You know, the “frequent studio updates”. When I quietly started Patreon campaign at the beginning of the year I had many ideas how to do these updates, and I shot and edited various videos, but mostly disliked them as somewhat inauthentic. ( Yes, we can discuss authenticity online, narcissism and all youtube-culture problems! :) )

However, today I’m happy to share with my patrons an issue of so called ‘work-journal’, mostly timelapse material edited with music and annotations. I stand behind it, it feels right. It feels honest. I hope it gives you a bit of a (week-long) view of my studio and different work environments I’m creating in: a club, a theatre hall, a studio.

The Making of Turns Me On video and EP

The writing below used to be a synopsis for a some kind of vlog progress report about how the Turns Me On video was made. To be honest, I recorded the talk but didn’t like it, but since it actually detailed in a brief way the process I converted it into a blog post.

making of Turns Me On sinopsis

The idea of this post is to give a peek at the behind the scenes ideas and mechanics that lead to the way the Turns Me On video turned out.

At the initial brainstorming the basic problem in that early stage seemed to be this question: does a video for a track about sexual excitement really needs hypersexualized images of women in any way? I really wanted to turn this stereotype on its head somehow and first had the idea to go to clothes shops with a friend, a young male actor, and take skirts, high heels, sexy tights and other women’s clothes, go to changing rooms and have another friend shoot him trying things on. But I was already getting late with finishing the main track, not to mention I wanted to make remixes and so on. So the video was on hold all this time as I was working on music and I felt I need a more flexible plan. And, you know, the need for flexibilty usually translates into kinda do-it-yourself quick guerilla work. At least with me.

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The Meaning of Netlabel Day

I’m not sure what happened, but it seems like I took notes for a short essay that I wanted to write for Netlabel Day 2016, but never got to it. But the notes seem to be quite to the point. So I’m simply leaving this here. Enjoy.

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Netlabel Day means
– freedom from the middlemen
– low production costs for bedroom producers
– asking ourselves what does the value of music depend on
– asking ourselves what platforms do we use for distribution

This has nothing to do with the physical media and wonderful sound of the vinyl.
This is not against the right that musican should be able to earn a living with their music.

Netlabel Day means this: music being at the center stage with help of digital distribution networks embracing the idea that information and artistic expression wants to be freely distributed.

This is about re-evaluating platforms like iTunes, Spotify, Apple Music. This is about re-evaluating how much of a slave each and every musician is to the music industry, to commodification of music, to the capitalism and exploitation.

This is not about the idea that everything should be free and costless while still costing many hours of work. It’s about thinking about in what system do we work and create, how this system forces us to sell our own work and ourselves and how free online access to music bypasses such systems.

It’s also an opportunity to think about how democratisation of taste and free access to all cultural works at any time from everywhere is really beneficial and how it is hurting creators & musicians.

Netlabel Day offers us an opportunity to think about the world of musical creativity and its distribution, which is far from simple black or white, good or bad.

studio video diary timelapse 8. May, 2016


A simple timelapse from yesterday’s work. It didn’t went smoothly, so you can see some Renoise audio work (Turns Me On alternative dub edit) but also other posting, mobile checking and typing stuff. What’s nice is the attached wide-angle lens which comes from an old DV cam and is taped on my Panasonic TM700 HD cam.
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Recursion EP in the making

Screenshot - 19. 02. 2016 - 16:33:45

(I wrote this as a public Patreon update)

Today I finished basic structure for a (extended club) remix of original Recursion track. This means that how the track evolves, where are drops, bridges, transitions and other elements is now laid out, I just need at least another day to smooth out the transitions so that they are the way they should be. After more than two weeks of pretty dark creep regarding work (including Patreon updates!) things started to move with a slightly faster pace, which is a relief.

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As I wrote before, the Recursion video is ready for release and during the weekend I want to prepare some teasers (animated gifs!) to go around social networks. I will post the video early at the beginning of the week to my patrons exclusively, the video and EP should be out on thursday or friday, and there’s a background story to the track Recursion that needs to be told. Not sure yet what form this telling will take (writing, video log or commentary to the music video), but I would love to take a form of an “open studio” video log.

In the meantime I’m rushing to finish another remix of Recursion track, send it into mastering and pack it into an EP for Bandcamp (and free name-your-price download).

First Patreon update, what’s cookin’?

Just posted this as my first post to Patreon: support my work at patreon.com/novadeviator!

Screenshot - 08. 01. 2016 - 18:14:32

 

It’s friday of the first week in 2016 and I’m shyly (for now) launching my Patreon page. This is a public update of what’s cookin’ in next month or two.

Firstly, I’m working towards the video for a track called “Recursion“, which is on album “ARP 339” relased on our little label Kamizdat under the Wanda & Nova deViator alias. The video will start as a montage of video material shot with 4 cameras at our performance ARP339 almost a year ago, where we created a peculiar club/concert situation inside a contemporary dance venue. I’m not sure what will happen within the editing process, but I’m pretty confident it will look … well … peculiar! In parallel I’m working on a single/EP release of the original track with edits and remixes. This will hopefully constitute a nice Patreon-supported release package: a video and an EP.

Secondly, I’m performing my latest audio-visual performance Interface Fractures III: Silicon in early March. This performance had a premiere in September 2015 but was not really finished. It was performed in somewhat improvisational “beta” version, so my goal is to create a finished final 1.0 release, a an audio-visual composition created in Processing, SuperCollider and Renoise. This means quite a lot of programming.

And on the last note for this update, I decided to lauch Patreon page without the intro video for now. I recorded and edited something right after New Years Eve but was not so happy with it and I decided it really needs some more work. I’m trying to listen to so many advices online (and voices in my head too!) saying I should love what I’m releasing. So hopefully by the next update the Patreon intro video will be up.

ARP 339 performance Screenshot - 08. 01. 2016 - 18:13:22

 

IF3: theories on audio-visual

Been reading the last part of Deleuze’s Cinema 2 – Time-image for most of the day. In the last chapter (The components of the image) he seems to be focused very much on sound (words, sounds, music) and finally on a ‘birth of the audio-visual‘. It looks like I’m searching for certain views, perspectives, thinking about the audio-visual, about the cinematic sound and image, electronic image in the cinema, in order to find paths towards concrete actions – programming, searching for content, recording, composing… Of course, Deleuze’s writing is philosophical, deep and extremely challenging, while Michele Chion’s is somewhat chaotic and (especially compared to Deleuze) superficial. But it seems to me that what I need is to extract workable concepts that will help me in a practical way. I suppose that Chion’s concepts are still imaginative and interesting enough for that purpose.

It is quite amazing that Deleuze writes in 1985:

“When the frame or the screen functions as instrument panel, printing or computing table, the image is constantly being cut into another image, being printed through a visible mesh, sliding over other images in an ‘incessant stream of messages, and the shot itself is less like an eye than an overloaded brain endlessly absorbing information: it is the brain-information, brain-city couple which replaces that of eye-Nature. […] a brain which has a direct experience of time, anterior to all motivity of bodies […].”

IF3 Progress Report #1

With the summer-time, a working-time on my new audio-visual piece, Interface Fractures III, begun. It is now almost confirmed that the date of premiere showing at Slovenian Cinemateque (Slovenska Kinoteka) is most probably 15/september. Since the plan was that we spend some quality sun&salt time at Croatian coast I brough some machinery with me to vacation. It’s always fun to work in the summer heat!

Anyway, with this next episode in the series I want to upgrade technically a “little bit”, so I acquired a better graphic card (Nvidia GTX960) and a multi-touch screen monitor with fullHD 1080p resolution. Adding also a 120GB SSD drive I needed to reinstall operating system (UbuntuStudio 14.4.1), separately compiled drivers for Nvidia and the rest worked pretty much out of the box (after some apt-get-ing). Multi-touch is application-dependent and my idea (for many years now) is to write custom interfaces for live sound/music/noise and visual composition and improvisation.

More technicalities: I compiled Processing and SuperCollider, tried a multi-touch library in Processing (SMT) but it didn’t work. Filed an issue at their GitHub and went on with a version of SuperCollider that supports multi-touch (I was kindly pushed in the right direction by Scott Cazan, who added MT support to his own branch of SC on GitHub). After some basic testing I wrote a simple granulator with a GUI. I also tested a very basic idea of TABs-like interface. In Processing I’ve whet my appetite with an excercise that focused on off-screen rendering and blending two images together.

Processing: slice and blend screeshot

 

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Responsibility towards structure

These days I continue to work on little pieces — drafts or sketches — that are possible seeds for serious tracks. They are mostly not longer than a minute, 16, maybe 20 bars, and contain a drumbeat, a bassline, or even solely a melodic line. I’m sitting on this kind of work for a good month already, so I have decided a week ago to try to work on longer pieces — still sketches or drafts — where I’d begin to work on structural ideas, calling them skeletons.

After a week of work I’m realising I’m still making short 1 minute sketches (which I’m posting the backstage section) without any serious attempt at bigger structure, and I’ve been thinking why is that so. One reason might be that I have about maksimum three hours in the morning to work on music-making (that’s pretty much self-imposed), but usually less. Another (and perhaps central) reason seems to be, however, certain reluctance to start working on a track’s structure.

Truth is, once you start working on a structure, musical work starts to be much more demanding. There’s so much more mental work involved once you start thinking through the timeline:  if this is here, then this must happen there or if here’s a breakdown there must be an announcement of it, perhaps through a build-up, or should it? And similar kind of thinking.

It seems suddenly creating music ceases to be only playing with sounds and beats but becomes some kind of story-making. And that has its own rules, which are as complex as they can get. When diving into the structural dimension of a time-based creation, what emerges is responsibility towards that dimension.